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Thread: Nepali business rules?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Odense, Denmark
    Posts
    11

    Default Nepali business rules?

    I have decided to visit the Himalayas and am preparing for a trek to EBC in march.
    I will be walking with my 2 kids aged 9 and 12, and we are opting for a route from Jiri, with extra acclimatization days, and flying back from Lukla. I want to travel independently, as I feel it is important to follow our own pace instead of that of a group.

    I have 6 weeks of vacation all together, and will spend the first 3 weeks travelling in South India. Therefore, I will not have more than 1 or 2 days to arrange things in Kathmandu, so I would prefer to do all the arrangements from home.

    However, I am a bit unaware about the rules of business in Nepal.
    I have inquired with a couple of agencies, and got a good quote and friendly treatment from a company called Unique Adventure.
    Now they asked about paying 25% of the agreed price up front.
    Here my ignorance kicks in ... is this common practice? What are chances that something will go wrong? How do you guys arrange treks from abroad?
    Do we need some kind of contract/fax/signature? What I have this far a long e-mail conversation.

    Best regards,
    Agata

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    201

    Default Re: Nepali business rules?

    It is customary to send a portion of the fee up front and if you are dealing with a reputable agency you should have no problem. The agency will often obtain your flight tickets in advance, though probably not in your case if you trekking in from Jiri, and have your guide travel to Kathmandu to meet you. In other words if they are going to put time and effort into your trip and get commitments from your guide, they want to know that you are committed.

    As to a contract, I have done two trips without one, but one would have been prepared had I requested. If I were dealing with an agency at home, I would undoubtably demand a contract. However in Nepal a contract seems less important. Between emails and web site details, the terms should be very clear. Aside from some the souvenir merchants and the money changer at the airport, I have found the Nepali very honest and fair. If there was something that required an adjustment, my agency made an adjust, no big deal. Assuming you're using a reputable agency, I think communication is the most important part.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Nepali business rules?

    hi agatap

    i would strongly urge you to consider hiring an independent guide for your trip instead of going through an agency

    you will get a much cheaper rate and have more control over who your guide is

    since i assume you will be staying in tea houses you and your two kids could make do with a guide and a couple of porters for carrying your stuff

    there are a number of guides who people have recommended on this site that you can check out

    i had a wonderful guide with me on a short trip to the langtang in 2004 which was one of the great experiences of my life -- he speaks good english, is very knowledgeable, and very cheerful and helpful -- and i intend to use him again when i next go trekking in nepal in the fall

    his name is gokharna khanal and you can reach him at green_societynepal@hotmail.com

    he can make all your arragements before you arrive, including airline reservations, transport to jiri, hiring appropriate high altitude porters, but you will need to send him some money in advance so he can rent the necessary equipment for himself and the porters ( to make sure they all have the necessary warm clothing, boots, rain gear, glasses, etc.), pay for plane tickets, hire transport to jiri etc etc

    he can give a detailed quote as to how much it will all cost including his and the porters' wages (usually they pay for food and lodging out of same) and for any equipment rental and insurance, as well as an estimate for your food and lodging (bearing in mind that the khumbu is more expensive than other trekking areas such as annapurna and the langtang)

    he works through an agency so he should be able to get all the necessary permits, insurance for himself and the porters, etc.

    he has a small blurb about himself at http://www.nepal-dia.de/int_England/...ev_porter.html

    if you do contact him, please mention my name

    best of luck and have a great trip

    xanadu

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Odense, Denmark
    Posts
    11

    Smile Re: Nepali business rules?

    Thx for enlightening me
    Has transferred money to the agency today - keeping my fingers crossed.
    Best,
    Agata

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