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Thread: Home now - some photos from my trip

  1. #1
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    Default Home now - some photos from my trip

    When I flew into Kathmandu, just over 3 weeks ago, I was rewarded with a spectacular view of the Himalaya.

    I saw on the flight map on the plane that we were flying over the Indian Plain between Delhi and Agra. I had a look out of the window and even though it was still dark there were huge storms raging and I could see hundreds of lightning strikes from above. It was quite spectacular.

    As though it had been planned that way, just as we arrived at the first part of the Himalayan chain that is visible from the flight in, the dawn began. The tops of the peaks poked through the ethereal haze layer and as the light increased and the hues changed I was greeted by Dhaulagiri, the Annapurna Himal, including Macchapuchre and so on through Manaslu, Ganesh before we descended into the city.



    In this picture you can see the Dhaulagiri Himal and Dhaulagiri herself, showing her massive south face.

    Escher

  2. #2

    Default Great picture!

    It's amazing to see the Himalayas qhen the airplane is approching it. Everyboby in the plane sprain their necks to see something from the small windows.

    I did shot this one, just a little before the plane land in Kathmandu. We came from Abu Dhabi:


    Someone knows which mountains are those?

  3. #3
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    Default More photos



    Ama Dablam



    A bird of prey flying over Taboche



    Hendrik, I am not sure what the mountain is in your picture. I have a picture of the same mountain. I will try to work out what it is and post back.

    Escher

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    Some really nice photos there Escher, love the "bird of prey flying over Taboche" and it even rhymes, Dr Suess style

    I just spotted your "handcart" photo on flickr - now THAT"S a great shot, I really like that.

  5. #5
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    Default Kathmandu

    Hey Brett, I read with interest your story from NZ it sounds like you had a really exciting time. Thats the real essence of mountaineering, I hope now you feel empowered to avoid the fixed ropes in Nepal. Your photographs are stunning, I have had a good look through. I hope you drive slowly in that car of yours!

    What are your plans now for a climbing trip to Nepal?

    After shafting my knee on this trip I took a lot of pictures of Kathmandu after not taking any there really since my first trip. I have got thousands of photos to process, that will keep me very busy for months. At least until it is time to start planning trip number 7!



    Due to the strike over the last couple of weeks the rubbish was (and I assume still is) starting to pile up, and it was really beginning to reek too. The cows though were having a field day and were happily munching away in the steaming piles of decomposing detritus.



    I am tempted to entitle this photo going to hell in a handcart and dedicate it to King Gyanendra.

    Escher

  6. #6
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    That cow seems to be enjoying that plastic bag As I said before that handcart shot really has something about it. I'm generally not an exceptionly "deep"/"artsy" person, but it talks to me - it speaks of both hope and despair, the present and the future. His cart is empty but there's hope in his willingness to push it further.... Anway, I'm just rambling now.

    Hmm, plans for climbing? Yeah, not too sure about that at the moment. The one things that I realised on my trip was the importance of finding the right climbing partner(s). The guys that I was climbing with were a great bunch of guys, but I don't think that a single one of them stopped once during the entire week to turn around, take a big breathe and just enjoy where they were.

    There was much too much emphasis on getting to the top lathered in sweat and completely out of breath, just to rest for 2 mins and then rush down again. I am much more into the journey these days, I've rushed through too much of life already to miss any more of it.

    I guess I'll never be a "peak bagger". It would provide me with more satisfaction to "almost" summit but take 1000 photos along the way and enjoy the views with a smile on my face than it would to actually reach the submit and collapse with exhaustion and have never enjoyed the journey.

    So I guess my (current) views on future climbing would be more of an extension to trekking, perhaps in more of a backcountry / glacier travel / minor peaks along the way type of trip.

    So what's the story with your knee anyway? And are you getting looked after now that you're back home again?

  7. #7
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    Default Alpinism

    I know what you mean about climbing, it can be really hard work, really scary and really unpleasant. But amongst the terror you do get to see some absolutely amazing sights that you just wouldn't experience otherwise. Summiting Island Peak on a clear day was fantastic, seeing the most incredible sunset from Ama Dablam camp 2, and when the sun came up amongst the jumbled glacier on the SE face of Artesonraju in Peru (you wouldn't believe the colours) were all treasured moments. But they did take a lot of toil to get there.

    I also like taking in the views and taking a lot of pictures and that is the great thing about climbing in Nepal. You can trek for 10 days to 2 weeks and do the normal trekking thing and then climb for one day to 2 weeks. You get the best of both worlds and you get to see those things that non-alpinists never do. So I wouldn't dismiss it just yet.

    Whenever I come back from a long and hard climbing trip I feel like putting my feet up, not thinking about climbing and I plan easier more sedate trips. But a week or two after the memories of the pain have faded the urge to do it all again comes back with a vengeance! So watch out you'll be hooked yet! You'll be looking at your pictures from NZ and thinking of the squeak of the neve under your crampons and you'll want to experience it all over again. Just you wait and see!

    Escher

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    Wink Knee

    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman347
    So what's the story with your knee anyway?
    As Oli and I headed up towards Maralung to have a crack at the Renjo La my left knee started to stiffen up. It is a ligament on the outside that makes walking painful after about 3-4 hours especially downhill. It curtailed our trekking plans quite a lot, we made it to Maralung above Thame and up to Mong. I spent a lot of time in Namche putting on weight, eating apple pie and <sshhh> on the internet.

    I have had exactly the same injury in my right knee and it will take a fair bit of physio to sort out, but at least I know it can be having had my right knee sorted out before.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman347
    And are you getting looked after now that you're back home again?
    I am not sure what you are talking about there Brett! I think someone else may be able to provide the answer. Getting things off your chest is always good for the soul. Someone definitely feels like a confessional.

    Escher

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    Nah, I'm not giving up on the climbing, I really enjoyed it and will continue, just saying that I plan to enjoy the journey and not be overly focused on "summitting" everything. But yeah I agree, the exposure can be a bit scary at times, particularly with a heavy pack, but the views from the top are amazing, just trying to remember to actually stop at the top (and one the way) and enjoy them.

    Not good news about your knee, I've been having a few problems with mine as well (patellofermoral tracking problems). Too much training on old knees I guess. Religious stretching and strengthening is the answer apparently just need to make sure you make time every day do the physio.

    Make sure that one of those sedate trips that you might be thinking about is a nice quiet weekend away in the country with "that someone special".

  10. #10
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    Default Stretching

    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman347
    Not good news about your knee, I've been having a few problems with mine as well (patellofermoral tracking problems). Too much training on old knees I guess. Religious stretching and strengthening is the answer apparently just need to make sure you make time every day do the physio.
    The annoying thing is that the injury is defintely prevented by stretching as I found out with my right knee, but I neglected to do any so it was my own fault. Will be a good reminder next time to get on with it as it can ruin a longed for trip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman347
    Make sure that one of those sedate trips that you might be thinking about is a nice quiet weekend away in the country with "that someone special".
    I tell you. I've been waiting a long time for just that! (I am going to be in trouble now for spilling the beans)!

    Escher

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