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  1. #11

    Default

    No, James. On the way Jiri > Lukla thre wasn't much Yaks. I think I didn't see more the half dozen of it. The porters looked to me that they knew pretty well that horrible ascents and knew what the most straight and low rocks. They didn't zigzag as me.

    Yeah, I think if I could take a look at myself climbing that hills, I would laugh. Sometimes I just stop on the rock, studing the next one before decided which side of it is lower and if my exit of it would be close or far from the next low side of the next step.

    It was really weird, but kind of keep my mind busy with something, so I would forget a little about the sun, pain and how much life sucks.

    []'s

    Hendrik

  2. #12
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    Sep 2004
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    Default

    As I think about it a yak owner in Namche told me that the pure blood yaks don't go much below Lukla. He said that the mix breeds (I forget their names) can go all the way down. Did you get a sense were all the porters were heading, because my sense was that most supplies for Lukla and above were flown into Lukla.

    At any point did you consider picking up a porter for some or all of your trek or was your budget to constraining?

  3. #13
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    Aug 2004
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    Wales, UK
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    871

    Default Ke garne?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hendrik van Dingenen
    So, Kegarme (funny, the corrector suggests “kedgeree” for your nick… I have no ideia what is an “Kegarme”, leave alone “kedgeree”)
    I can answer that...

    "Ke garne?" is one of my favourite Nepali idioms. Literally it means "what to do?", it is an expression of mild despair and resignation to a hopeless situation. Frequently accompanied by a sigh and shrugging of the shoulders.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sushma Amatya

    http://www.nepalnews.com.np/contents...pendent/10-03/

    Ke garne?, is the catchword of the average and also not so average Nepalis. One gets to hear this word at least once, each and every day. This phrase means, ‘what to do?’, that signifies complacency and helplessness - not very dissimilar from the three vultures in The Jungle Book asking each other, “what do we do now?” and the other replying with the same phrase. We civilised, gentle people use the Ke Garne phrase when nothing happens, when things go wrong and when they refuse to go right; and get sympathetic replies from others with the same phrase.

    Everybody uses this word - the politicians, businessmen, government servants, housewives, students and so on. We seem to hang on to this word like a favorite mantra that seems to act like a balm on our psyches. Ke Garne is often followed by Yestai Chha!, meaning - this is how things are; our version of ‘life is like that’.
    Kedgeree is a fish dish, google for recipes.

    HTH

  4. #14
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    Oct 2004
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    Thumbs up Yaks

    He said that the mix breeds = Dzopkyo's.

    yes Ke garne - I love it as well.....followed by the shrug and possibly a little head wobble. I'll be back in March and look forward to experiencing it again.

  5. #15
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    Default ke garne

    Quote Originally Posted by kegarne
    possibly a little head wobble
    Oh yes, that's absolutely spot on!

  6. #16

    Default Part IV

    About the yaks: I call everything "yak", even knowing that not all are the yaks. The few ones I saw before Lukla had short fur and weren't much used for carrying loads. This why I said that the army of yaks we see above Lukla must be a tourist thing. I'm joking, of course, because I don't know the reason why they don't use much yaks, the one with short fur, as load transporters. Maybe the porters are cheap or the hills are to steep. Really don't know.

    As for your questions, James: I got the impression that the porters before Lukla do “portering” basically between the villages. On the way between villages I have find lots of porters and we had almost the same pace. But he following days I didn't see most of them anymore on the way to the next village. So, I think “portering” before Lukla concerns more for trading between neighbor villages then long range trades. I think the goods come by bus and truck from Kathmandu to Jiri and from there is slowly distributed to the inner villages.

    And yes, I did consider hiring a porter. Before leaving to there, I thought the independent trekking was the "proper way" to trek, but I think now that in the case of a Nepal trek, you would enjoy your trek much more if you hire a porter. OK that I overdid the load on my pack, but even so. With a porter I think you really can spare more time for sigh viewing, photos, rest, etc. But I think that if I even get back there, I would again carry my own stuff, only that lots less this time.

    I just ask that, if someone is going to hire a porter, should be careful checking that the agency is looking at the well being of the guy or be sure to look youself for it. I saw some disturbing “portering” on the way above Lukla on some organized groups or even individual trekkers. Not nice stuff at all.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Marcéu taking a look on the middle of a 109m length suspended bridge over the Dudh Kosi, on our way to Bupsa, last nigth before Lukla.

    Day 06

    Perhaps by now I could say we were pretty used to the trail. It was a kind of submission felling, some kind of semi-religious acceptance of the inevitably, fate or wherever you want cal it, instead of being more fitted or used of the trail. To say the true, I never got used of the trail. I got used of the load on my back, hips and shoulders hurting on every step, the sweat on my eyes, the diarrhea and the being always the last to arrive anywhere. Those were kind of fatalities that I got used to think that I couldn’t escape. But the trail… that was something else. After a few hours walking, I always ended with the felling that that was some kind of punishment, like mom use to ground me because I did something wrong. But contrary to the mom’s grounding, I couldn’t sneak way from this one.

    The way to Bupsa it’s pretty much… Nepal. It’s long, full of up and down, switches, and never coming end point. But I can say that was easier then Deurali or Sete, what wasn’t some difficult thing to be. Not much trails can brag to be as difficult as Deurali or Sete, I believe.

    The walk to Khari Khola was a little disturbing to me. Me brother was always in front and soon I could only see him here and there, as a little speck far way. But his position was strange, because looked always as being in some place that I couldn’t put as a continuity of the path that I was following. And the a few hours later I was there. The switchbacks were so long that I’ve go through the morning with the felling that I was lost. But, as I’ve read on the Net and on the books before leaving: just follow the shit. Normally, it works.

    Just before Khari Khola there is some lodges, where my brother was waiting for me. Of course I couldn’t give him the pleasure of acknowledge of how my walk was slow and not much less tiring then his, so I did a big show of how I was OK, not tired at all and, hey, what about run to the top of that small crest?

    We did had lunch at Khari Khola. By now I had convinced my brother, at high cost of being hated by this, to search for lodges where rooms and food could be negotiated at better prices. The brother has good knowing of English, better then me, but he is kind of shy, more then me, in putting it at practice. It was another Everest of fights to convince him that it was not fair that every little thing should be resolved by me if he was the first to get on the places.

    We had walk-talkies with us. Since we were far from Bandhar, we start to use it more often to talk about food and prices. The problem is that the damn thing start go arouse lots of curiosity, what is normal. The problem is that my English is bad and most English of Nepali folk is also bad. All the time someone saw the walk-talk hanging on my backpack, I had to try to explain, painfully, what was that, how it works, what can be done and no, it wasn’t a cellfone. Later I would says only: it’s a radio, for music.

    After lunch, I took a big breath and go to the ascent to Bupsa. At last THAT hill was visible from Khari Khola. It some kind helps the morale if you know your enemy. All the ascents before that I’ve fell like being entrapped by the hill, as some innocent prey that walks to the lion’s den without knowing about the lion. The felling of being betrayed or lured was always there. But with Bupsa was OK. I saw what I was going have to do and saw where the village was. I felled that I was on control of the situation.

    Silly me…

    Sure it was no Deurali or Sete, but the climb took more then 3 hours, I think. Again the lost of sense of distance and dimension had played on me and the hill wasn’t that small.

    By now there was already lots of people coming and going. I got the impression that the Nepali people like to tag with you and have small talks while walking. But I barely could walk and breathe! How they expected me to do small talk??? The fact of me being Brazilian didn’t exactly help. All the time had to talk about football players, and THAT is my brother’s field, because I’m not big fan of football, so I couldn’t say much. But since Brazil is synonymous of football, my ignorance of the subject wasn’t credible.

    Eventually, the gods know how, I got in Bupsa. My brother was there, chatting with some Nepali fellas about Ronaldinho, Romário and likewise. Tired, exhausted and in pain, I got rude and ask him what about the lodges arrangement. I thought he was running away from the deal of “who get there first, arrange all”. But he told me that he too got there only 5 minutes ago and was only taking some rest because the hill was hard and how I was an asshole and I surely didn’t excepted him to go running for lodges without resting a little, didn’t I? I kind of didn’t believe him and say so, because how could he get there 5 minutes before me if he was lots faster then me? Then I realized that on a long range walk, there wasn’t big final time difference between his walk and mine.

    After we cooled down, we get in a lodge, have shower and eat like yaks. There in Bupsa I watched one of most beautiful sunset I ever saw. It was magic. The Nepali’s sky is magical. I hoop it stays like that forever and the ONU declare that skies as “World Heritage”.

    To be continued…

    []'s

    Hendrik
    Last edited by Hendrik van Dingenen; 22nd March 2006 at 01:19 PM.

  7. #17
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    Sep 2004
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    201

    Default

    I had read that the walkie-talkies were a restricted item subject to a special fee, permit or some such thing. My sense was that given the military sensitivities, they were restricted in the same way cell phone service was blocked back in February. Did you "declare" your radios or receive any comment or notice when going through the airport check points?

    Keep on posting!

  8. #18

    Default James

    Hoy, James!

    No, our packs weren't checked when we arrived in Kathmandu. They didn'task for the imunization paper also, the one proving we had take our shots for malaria, tetano, etc. After we pay the visa fee, we just walk away to the scavengers. There was a police guy there, but he just wave us out.

    In Jiri the owner of the lodge where we stayed adviced us to keep he walk-talkies inside the packs untill we were out Maoist area, because they could take it away. But after that we had it always hanging on the pack. I didn't even new about the ban.

    []'s

    Hendrik

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    10

    Default Any further Maoist encounters after Bhandar?

    Hi, Hendrik: Interesting narrative! Last trekked in the Khumbu starting from Lukla. We are considering flying into Phaplu (near Junbesi in your narrative) next spring (as per a suggested alternative in McGuiness' 2002 book). Did you encounter any more Maoists (e.g., asking to see your receipt) after they extracted the 5000 rupees from you in Bhandar? Yes, too bad the "fee" is so exorbitant, as it has/will undoubtedly further reduce the number of trekkers between Jiri and Lukla, hurting the locals the most. Meanwhile, looking forward to reading more of your adventure! Richard

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    201

    Talking

    There are no "required" vacinations for entry into Nepal, though you would be unwise to not get the suggested medicines. But concerning raidios I have read that an operating license must be obtained and paid for to use two-way radio equipment and telephones. I would also bet that there were more restrictions place on two way radios back in February, though that is just speculation. The military would not want the Maoist to get your radios. Oops, we all make mistakes, all the better no one noticed!

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