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Thread: Trekking Hints & Tips

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    564

    Default Here's my list

    Ok, it looks like I'll be going a bit heavier lots more weight in the sleeping bag and pack itself primarily.

    I am taking a small pharmacy with me, but it weighs nothing so I see no problem in that.

    1) 70L pack (~3kg)
    2) 4 season down sleeping bag (~2kg)
    3) silk bag liner
    4) 2 x long sleeve thermal shirts (1 polypro, 1 Icebreaker)
    5) 2 x long sleeve shirts (1 Lowe Alpine dryflo, 1 Berghaus Tech-T)
    6) light fleece half-zip pullover (Technopile)
    7) Heavy fleece jacket (Gore Windstopper)
    8) Down jacket
    9) Gortex jacket
    9) 2 x Lowe Alpine dryflo tights (1 light, 1 heavyweight)
    10) nylon trekking pants (zip-off legs)
    11) Berghaus Pertex pants (wind/rain resistant)
    12) 4 x liner socks (2 coolmax, 2 polypro)
    13) 3 x wool socks
    14) wool/thinsulate hat (beanie)
    15) baseball cap
    16) 3 x coolmax underwear
    17) 2 x trekking poles
    18) sunscreen
    19) small pocket knife
    20) nail clippers
    21) headlamp and spare lithium batteries (AAA)
    22) Anti-bac handwash
    23) 50ml bodywash
    24) SPF 30+ lipbalm stick x 2
    25) iodine water treatment tablets
    26) small combination padlock
    27) toilet paper and cigarette lighter
    28) small roll-on deodorant
    29) 50ml biodegradable fabric wash
    30) 50ml shampoo
    31) 50ml conditioner
    32) toothbrush/paste/floss
    33) small microfibre travel towel
    34) Neurofin Plus (ibuprofin/codeine) - 24 capsules
    35) flagyl (antibiotic - gastrointestinal)
    36) Cephalexin (antibiotic - wound/chest infection)
    37) Imodium (diarrhoea treatment) - 8 capsules
    38) Metoclopramide (anti-nausea)
    39) gastrolyte (rehydration salts)
    40) tiger balm
    41) 1 compression bandage
    42) 1 roll straping tape for bad knees
    43) 1 pkt bandaids
    44) blister tape (6 small-toes / 6 large-heels)
    45) 2 x 1L aluminium water bottles (1 to use, extra 1 for longer day trips)
    46) Sunglasses
    47) 3 x stuff sacks
    48) 200gm fresh coffee (I need SOME decent coffee)
    49) plastic insulated travel cup with inbuilt coffee plunger
    50) map
    51) notepad and pen
    52) ear plugs

    + camera gear

    and forgot to mention footwear - 1 pr Asolo TPS Brenta, 1 pr Keen H2O sandals

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,851

    Default yakshaver

    not bad. I don't take the extra rain and wind proof pants. Just normal sturdy, and somewhat wind proof, Macpac (could be any brand really) trekking pants. When it gets really cold above 4000m, I may wear the polyprop long johns underneath for the day. Especially if it is also windy.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,285

    Default Here is what I would leave out - otherwise a very good list

    Ok, it looks like I'll be going a bit heavier lots more weight in the sleeping bag and pack itself primarily.

    I am taking a small pharmacy with me, but it weighs nothing so I see no problem in that.

    1) 70L pack (~3kg)
    2) 4 season down sleeping bag (~2kg)
    3) silk bag liner
    4) 2 x long sleeve thermal shirts (1 polypro, 1 Icebreaker)

    ***
    I would only take the thermal shirts and not 5) below. The ice breaker can be worn all the time as it doesn't stink and you can wear both when it is cold. Saving 1/2 kilo

    5) 2 x long sleeve shirts (1 Lowe Alpine dryflo, 1 Berghaus Tech-T)
    6) light fleece half-zip pullover (Technopile)
    7) Heavy fleece jacket (Gore Windstopper)

    *** I wouldn't take the heavy fleece, I would take a pertex windshell instead(some are less than 100grms - Montane ones can be found v. cheap in the UK). When you are walking base layer, light fleece and windproof will be enough for nearly all situations. If it is really cold or snowing just throw on your duvet. If it is very, very cold 2 base layers, light fleece, windproof, down jacket will be much more insulation than you'll need. Even if you don't take a pertex top I still wouldn't take this fleece, at lunch stops when it is windy just put your down jacket on.

    Weight saving 1kg. Windstopper is HEAVEEE! ;-)

    8) Down jacket
    9) Gortex jacket

    *** Don't need a goretex jacket as well as the other stuff. Saving up to 1kg.

    9) 2 x Lowe Alpine dryflo tights (1 light, 1 heavyweight)
    10) nylon trekking pants (zip-off legs)

    *** maybe take two sets of trekking pants

    11) Berghaus Pertex pants (wind/rain resistant)

    *** Would chuck out these too. Saving 300grms

    12) 4 x liner socks (2 coolmax, 2 polypro)
    13) 3 x wool socks
    14) wool/thinsulate hat (beanie)
    15) baseball cap
    16) 3 x coolmax underwear
    17) 2 x trekking poles
    18) sunscreen
    19) small pocket knife
    20) nail clippers
    21) headlamp and spare lithium batteries (AAA)

    *** If you are taking something like a petzl tikka then I will eat my yak wool hat if the batteries run out! Lithium in an LED headtorch will last 100hours plus, that is a lot of trips to the toilet and four readings of War and Peace! In the unlikely event that they run out you can buy batteries in the hills anyway.

    22) Anti-bac handwash
    23) 50ml bodywash
    24) SPF 30+ lipbalm stick x 2
    25) iodine water treatment tablets
    26) small combination padlock
    27) toilet paper and cigarette lighter
    28) small roll-on deodorant
    29) 50ml biodegradable fabric wash
    30) 50ml shampoo
    31) 50ml conditioner

    *** Travel wash can be used for washing yourself, washing clothes and your hair - you could save a couple hundred grams here. Or you could do what I do and not have any hair!

    32) toothbrush/paste/floss
    33) small microfibre travel towel
    34) Neurofin Plus (ibuprofin/codeine) - 24 capsules
    35) flagyl (antibiotic - gastrointestinal)
    36) Cephalexin (antibiotic - wound/chest infection)
    37) Imodium (diarrhoea treatment) - 8 capsules
    38) Metoclopramide (anti-nausea)
    39) gastrolyte (rehydration salts)
    40) tiger balm
    41) 1 compression bandage
    42) 1 roll straping tape for bad knees
    43) 1 pkt bandaids
    44) blister tape (6 small-toes / 6 large-heels)
    45) 2 x 1L aluminium water bottles (1 to use, extra 1 for longer day trips)

    *** Although Sigg water bottles don't weigh that much I take a 1 litre platypus, they weigh absolutely nothing and roll up small to save a little bulk

    46) Sunglasses
    47) 3 x stuff sacks
    48) 200gm fresh coffee (I need SOME decent coffee)
    49) plastic insulated travel cup with inbuilt coffee plunger
    50) map
    51) notepad and pen
    52) ear plugs

    + camera gear

    and forgot to mention footwear - 1 pr Asolo TPS Brenta, 1 pr Keen H2O sandals

    ******

    Your list looks almost identical to mine when I first went and the clothes I have suggested to leave out were the items I never wore and I was there in the middle of Winter (jan/feb) and it was really cold and snowed a fair bit. After carrying all that gear up lots of big hills I realised that minimising weight is far more IMPORTANT than having certain items. A goretex jacket and big fleece are not going to make you warmer when your knees are absolutely wrecked and you are totally knackered from carrrying too much stuff, that certainly was my feeling after lugging 20kgs to base camp!

    I reckon you can easily save 2-3 kgs out of that list and it will make no difference whatsoever to your comfort, safety and warmth. But it will make a significant difference to your walking enjoyment.

    Other than that your list is spot on, I don't think there is anything I would add.

    Good luck with your trip, I hope you have an awesome time.

    Escher

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    13

    Default Save weight - DIET

    Guaranteed way to save weight without having to cut tooth brush handles off - DIET. No point in going nuts paring down the baggage to an absolute minimum if you are lugging a few Kgs of excess body weight. You will gradually put on the weight with all the carbohydrates you eat on the trek which are balanced by the gradual reduction in the luggage weight as consumeables are used up.



    Oh and - Bar of antiseptic soap instead of liquid soap / shampoo etc, bar is much more convenient and lasts a lot longer.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,285

    Wink Liquid dry soap is a god send

    Not quite sure what your point is but I swear by dry liquid soap, with it there is no need to use untreated water or waste water you have already treated. It weighs less than a bar and I have used it on more than 10 treks and several climbing expeditions and we have all avoided any sort of illness or food poisoning because we use it.

    Actually you might have the right idea. If we all get food poisoning we could lose a few pounds and all be lighter in the hills. ;-)

    Why not go for the ultimate arrangment? Pack only what you need, take a small pack and be fit and lose some weight. Or are you suggesting that we should all carry far too much stuff that we won't use but balance that out by going on a diet? If the choice is mine then I will carry only what I need which isn't much and be fit and strong enough for the trek or climb. While in the hills I then only eat what I need as I find the natural rhythm of existing ensures that I only take what I need. There is no requirement for comfort eating, when I am surrounded by the splendour of nature my spirit is nurtured enough without the need to overeat and get fat.

    Thanks for your input you obviously know what you are talking about.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    564

    Default

    Thanks for your feedback Escher.

    ***I would only take the thermal shirts and not [long sleeve dryflo shirts]...
    Yep good call, there's no additional warmth those shirts, I get sucked into thinking that they are only 200gms or so, and forget that 10 x 200gms or so = 2kgs!

    *** I wouldn't take the heavy fleece... Weight saving 1kg. Windstopper is HEAVEEE! ;-)......
    Indeed it is, my girlfriend has been trying to talk me out of this item as well, I won't tell her that she was right though... and neither will you!

    *** Don't need a goretex jacket as well as the other stuff. Saving up to 1kg.....
    I'd almost concinved myself of this already, it IS a big heavy jacket, but it's one that I already had and spending money on gear has gotten a little out of hand. I'll look into these Pertex jackets, sounds like a damn good idea.

    *** maybe take two sets of trekking pants
    11) Berghaus Pertex pants (wind/rain resistant)
    *** Would chuck out these too. Saving 300grms
    The Pertex pants are not actually much heavier than my trekking pants (maybe that says more about my trekking pants than it does about the Pertex pants). Just to make it clear, I'm only taking 1 x trekking pants and 1 x Pertex pants. Dropping the Pertex for another pair of trekking pants wouldn't make much difference. I think that I'll stick with the original pants.

    *** If you are taking something like a petzl tikka then I will eat my yak wool hat if the batteries run out!....
    Yep, thinking about it, you're right here as well (although you probably know that already). I do have a LED headlamp, and it it should last for ages, it's not like I'm going to be climbing in the night or anything.

    *** Travel wash can be used for washing yourself, washing clothes and your hair - you could save a couple hundred grams here. Or you could do what I do and not have any hair....
    Luckily(?) I have a full head of hair. This is a personal one as I suffer from eczema on my scalp which can get pretty nasty if I don't use a medicated shampoo every 2-3 days. I'm actually very interested as to wether the change in diet (less processed foods), and less day to day stresses about work/general life etc will make a difference to this.

    *** Although Sigg water bottles don't weigh that much I take a 1 litre platypus, they weigh absolutely nothing and roll up small to save a little bulk
    I don't really have a problem with bulk as there is HEAPS of space in my pack (which probably highlights that I could get away with a smaller pack, but I can really justify spending even more money on another pack at this point)

    ***Good luck with your trip, I hope you have an awesome time.
    Thanks, just got to get there now.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    871

    Default Trekking is good for your health

    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman347
    Luckily(?) I have a full head of hair. This is a personal one as I suffer from eczema on my scalp which can get pretty nasty if I don't use a medicated shampoo every 2-3 days. I'm actually very interested as to wether the change in diet (less processed foods), and less day to day stresses about work/general life etc will make a difference to this.
    Maybe. I have a bit of eczema (hands & feet), probably a symptom of stress & bad diet. On my first visit to Nepal I was amazed at the difference it made. Within a couple of days it had (almost) completely healed, and stayed clear throughout my trek and R&R. But as soon as I flew home and back to work it flared up again. YMMV

    And a full head of hair is a Good Thing, keeps the fierce sun off sensitive skin and good insulation for a cold night.
    Last edited by Oli; 1st December 2005 at 04:42 AM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,851

    Default yakshaver's list of items for 18-20 day trek in Dec 2005

    Here we go. Decided to publish my stuff as well. There is a bit more stuff than usual, as I am going for a bit longer, and with a small group.


    Yakshaver’s list for 18-20 day trek in the Anapurnas Dec 05:

    1. Duffel bag for porter to carry stuff (one only for my son and me).
    2. 35 litre daypack (Macpac)
    3. Goretex jacket (Kathmandu)
    4. Down jacket (Mountain Designs)
    5. Down Sleeping Bag 1.6 kg (850 grams of high quality down, 750 loft), big enough to fit Scarlett Johanson inside as well, at a pinch…
    6. Silk liner for the sleeping bag (the one in which you can get in confortably – large enough for yakshaver & Scarlett J.)
    7. 3x polypropylene underwear (tops & longjohns – you should see me in those, man!)
    8. 3x merino underwear – earth sea sky - ah! The smell!!
    9. 2 x singlets (actually one singlet and on t-shirt, everything is non-cotton
    10. 3 x thick woollen socks (coolmax merino and Explorer, the later excellent value for money)
    11. 3 x liner socks (make tea with them after one week wearing, instead of washing: you have a good tea, AND you save on detergent.
    12. 3 x long sleeve shirts (earth sea & ski, mountain designs and Columbia, to keep everyone happy
    13. warm beanie (wool with thinsulate lining – although I have my doubts about its usefulness: what is there to protect? Half a neuron. Usually misfiring.)
    14. Sunhat – ditto above
    15. pair of gloves
    16. pair of booties (fleece with rubber soles – excellent for breaks during the day, and in the evening. The downside is that the “socks tea” can be a bit weak…
    17. 1 pair of trekking pants (Macpac Crossterrain)
    18. 1 pair of swimming shorts (for breaking the ice and swimming at Tilicho, or maybe the hot pools along the Marsyangdi valley)
    19. 1 l plastic large opening water bottle
    20. 2 litre platypus water bottle (the one above was of pee*ng in the room when it’s too cold outside…)
    21. Water Treatment (iodine pills + neutralizer which is really just effervescent vitamin C)
    22. 2 x trekking poles (Leki) – these are also good to ward off dogs and beggars – useless against the luscious yeti woman
    23. Cigarette lighter (for no good reason… just in case I wish to take up smoking all of a sudden)
    24. Toiletries (tooth brush & paste, nail clippers, deodorant, small bottle 30ml Christian Dior Dune for Men (who nows… maybe I meet Scarlett Johanson on trek), shaving kit – this I have pretty light – I find that shaving every third day keeps the luscious yeti woman away…
    25. Microfibre towel
    26. Toilet roll – in fact two maybe (as sometimes I am really full of $#!t)
    27. Sunscreen (hate the sun. It competes with my natural brilliance)
    28. Moisturiser - I needed progressive desensitisation to be able to touch the stuff. Please don’t tell anyone I use it, no real man should use this. But my hands/fingers don’t crack so much on the dry and sometimes dusty trails. Things we have to go through when going to the Himal...
    29. NO lip balm – I can’t stand it!
    30. Wet serviettes like “wet ones” (the ones with moisturiser…) – And I do take the dirty ones back with me… well, the porter carries them back… This saves having to mess around with other hand cleaners.
    31. Combination padlock (useful not just for locking your lodge room, but also for any s&m one might be tempted to do at Yak Kharka)
    32. Head Torch with batteries (dual halogen and LED lights)
    33. Watch (Suuno, with watch, altimeter, barometer, compass, rate of ascent etc, makes tea, cooks light meals – very light, BIG and YELLOW – everyone around is impressed!
    34. Swiss Army knife with scissors, saw, magnifying glass, and 150000 other functions: can perform amputations and brain surgery. Makes tea and cooks light meals as well. Again, I think it’s useless on a lodge trek… But everyone has a Swiss Army Knife for goodness’sake!
    35. 3-4 stuff sacks (at least two compressable ones- esp for clothing, fleece stuff & my head)
    36. Sturdy plastic bag (with elstic to seal it) for rubbish I need to take back (used wet-ones tissues, condoms – but you didn’t want to know the details I am sure. No I am not taking all this back with me to Australia, as this country has the most regressive, anallyretentive, intrusive and stupid customs service in the world)
    37. Sunglasses (good quality, light, and stable on the head) – brand name, must be!
    38. Binnoculars (no problem, I have a porter)
    39. Medical kit: all the usual stuff for strains, sprains & blisters, bandaids, bandages of various kinds, leucoplast, disinfectant, tweezers, swiss army knife for brain surgery and amputations, cotton wool balls. DRUGS: codeine phosphate (excellent to know yourself out; take slightly more and you’ll be happy . Good general drug for everything man!) Panedine, Disprin, Diamox, Dexamethasone, some antihistamine, Lomotil, Maxalon, Erytromicine, Amoxil flagyl, rehidration salts, daktarin, rash cream. Other drugs, depending on budget, and in quantities which will not get you hanged in some idiotic and barbaric country which still has the death penalty.
    40. Camera & kit: Nikon D50 with a 28-80 and a 100-300 lens. I don’t know why I take two lenses… Obsessive I guess. Two long lasting lithium ion batteries already charged. At altitude in December I keep this in my breast pocket, and at night in the sleeping bag. I am not a pervert.
    41. Small repair kit.
    42. Light pair of sneakers
    43. Boots (Scarpa trekpro this time. I tried to replace my old zamberlan pair with same, but could not find it in time. Scarpa don’t look anywhere near as sexy as the Zamberans, but they feel just as good.)
    44. Money – plenty of rupees
    45. Passport (I keep these last two items in a pouch on the body. Very sensual, both of them)
    46. yakshaving kit

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    13

    Default Telephoto lenses

    yakshaver - did you use the 100 - 300 lens?

    I took one first time but since then have found that almost everything I have taken whether inside or outside is at the wide end. 24mm - 100mm would be ideal if I could afford it.

    I also changed from DSLR to a good compact (28-100) since I found the benefit of being able to easily get at a smaller camera instead of missing shots because I could not be bothered with digging the DSLR out of the LowePro or the annoyance of the LowePro banging your chest or thighs far outweighed the the slightly lower spec. In any case I reckon my laptop display or my printer limits the quality rather than the camera lens / sensor.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,285

    Default Definitive lists

    Quote Originally Posted by Oli
    And a full head of hair is a Good Thing, keeps the fierce sun off sensitive skin and good insulation for a cold night.
    It would be nice if I could grow enough!

    Brilliant list Yakshaver (and absolutely hilarious! ) I think we now have packing lists covered for those with porters and those wanting to carry their own stuff. Ta. How long now fdo you have to wait?

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