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Thread: Trekking Hints & Tips

  1. #101
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Coast Canada
    Posts
    749

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    The two times I have been in Chukkung it has been the coldest area of all my trips in Nepal. I think colder than crossing Trashi lapka. Course it was October.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,285

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    It's hard to generalise based on our combined trips up the Imja valley but when I've been up there the weather and temps weren't any different than the other areas in the Khumbu. It was that generally sunny, chilly in the shade/warm in the sun and a little bit below freezing at night sort of weather that I have had 95% of the time when I've been in Nepal (if you know what I am on about). It was no more than -15c (actually more like -10) when I camped at 6150m a week later. That said, when Julia went to Island Peak in April (just after I had been there) it chucked it down with snow and was properly baltic (I was back in KTM by this point) and this is why "which boots" is a hard question to answer. It all depends on what you encounter and how much of a safety margin you want.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Escher

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    Well you guys are not much help. I was hoping for the definative answer "YOU HAVE TO DO IT THIS WAY", Part of me wants to use the Trango's and the other part does not like cold feet. We are using porters and I was trying not to make them carry so much weight but I suppose I could take the Nepals's for climbing and do the rest of the trip in my light hikers.

    I guess it's like any trip to the mountains, you never know what you are going to get till you get there.

    Actually the answers were helpful as they confirmed what I already knew. You just have to make the decision and then live with it.

  4. #104

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    above tips are enough for trekking

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,851

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by lazy climber
    Well you guys are not much help. I was hoping for the definative answer "YOU HAVE TO DO IT THIS WAY", Part of me wants to use the Trango's and the other part does not like cold feet. We are using porters and I was trying not to make them carry so much weight but I suppose I could take the Nepals's for climbing and do the rest of the trip in my light hikers.

    I guess it's like any trip to the mountains, you never know what you are going to get till you get there.

    Actually the answers were helpful as they confirmed what I already knew. You just have to make the decision and then live with it.
    It is good to see someone coming to their own conclusions and making their own decisons. It is a sign of emerging emotional maturity.
    For any serious climb, like Island Peak, I would recommend La Sportiva Makalu. They are not for climibing Everst, but they are excellent for anything else, heavy duty without being to heavy, take any kind of crampons etc. I simply used them to run down the most difficult scree slopes from Thorung La towards Muktinath. While other trekkers were being extremely cautions, as they had to be on some portions of that descent, I was dancing down the scree cross country cutting accross the path switchbacks, diggin the trusty heels of the Makalus without any problem whatsoever. It was almost like some kind of skiing. Loved it.
    yakshaver

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Slovakia (mostly)
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    Seeking an advice on a mid-layer-ish thing that can double as soft shell...

    Going the EBC/Gokyo trek mid October-mid November, the plan is to spend 10-11 nights at Dingboche and higher, with trips (sometimes well) over 5000m during those days.
    What I plan to take:

    1. GoreTex jacket - 900g, bombproof. Yes, I know, most would say I don't need that. However, it has served me well over the years and its my go-to gear when the weather is seriously bad. In fact, it is my only jacket that will truly protect me when it is cold and really windy. Works well also in those driving sleet conditions... I prefer to go out even if the conditions are not 100% - I would hate to stay in the lodge only because it looks like it might get bad and I have no gear to protect me if it indeed becomes bad. Of course, most of the time the weather does not became so bad, so the right choice is to go out - but have the security of knowing that I have the gear for the bad stuff.

    2. Down jacket - GoLite Inferno ~550g - does not have hood, but the price was right. For around the lodge, morning/evening low activity stuff.

    3. Cloudweil lont sleeve shirt - 260g - thin, but somewhat wind resistant, worn over a base layer or on its own will be the main thing on me up to Namche.

    4. midweight synthetic & lightweight merino long sleeve baselayer

    5. lightweight syntetic T-shirt - for warm days, or as additional layer for the core


    I need to add something moderately warm to put between #1 and #4 when I am moving, but it is really cold (think morning high up there, when I want to see the first light shining on the peaks). Ideally, it would be somewhat wind-resistant, so I can wear it above #3 without putting on #1.

    Right not I am using cheapo (think wallmart) fleece, which works OK as a warmer layer, but does not stop the wind and is too heavy (almost 700g). I would prefer something lighter, and with some weather resistance.

    Any advice? Most soft shells seem too expensive (would prefer <= $100USD,) and too heavy/too much for what I need..

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Slovakia (mostly)
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    I checked some stores around here. I found The North Face Nimble jacket to be approximately what I want (light fleece equivalent for warmth, but with some wind/weather protection built in), but a bit on the heavy side. The local price was too high (99Euro), in US it can be had for ~80USD....

    I saw in the store also that light Pertex wind-jacket. I could not really trust this thing to be my main shell...

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    Softshells are good for a day of backcountry sking but too heavy/bulky for backpacking. Check out the Marmot DriClime jacket.It will handle many different conditions.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Slovakia (mostly)
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    Uff, thanks. I am now studying a lot about gear... DriClime looks good, but perhaps something with a hood would be more flexible...

    I am also thinking about replacing my GTX jacket with something lighter/more breathable, but still with enough protection. There are options... but they are expensive, and I have to think hard what I really need....

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Trekking Hints & Tips

    My DriClime does have a hood but I don't see that option now. Again from Marmot check out the Precip for light rainware. I only use Gor-tex if it will rain but the Precip is much more compact and light. My wife and I both brought ours on the AC last Oct. It sheds wind,rain and keeps the warmth in. I used the DriClime pants with zips when it got cold. I've also got the vest that sees the most use(yeah, I like the stuff).

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