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Thread: Fitness

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    20

    Default Fitness

    Just a general question; what sort of fitness do you need for trekking. Lets say the Guerilla Trek for example. I read it goes up to 4000m, about 14 days i think. Ive not done a lot of trekking (never been that high)..but what sort of fitness regime would you need for that trek..i mean how many kilometres/week/altitude etc would u need to do to prepare? I mean I dont want to be asking my guide for helicopters every 5 minutes. When does altitude sickness kick in? cheers guys and galls.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    266

    Default Re: Fitness

    Any preparative training will increase your enjoyment and decrease strain on the trail. That is not to say that you necessarily need any - depends on your starting condition I guess. Any how much you intend to push yourself (how many hours a day will you walk? carry your own gear?). As Mr Average, I find that with no prep, a relaxed week on the trail with a pack will get me walk-fit.

    There is little worry from AMS below say 3000m (possibly as low as 2500m). As sharp rise above 3000m can cause a problem. General principal sleep low/walk high.
    rich

    No one goes so far or so fast as the man who does not know where he is going. H.W.Tilman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    564

    Default Re: Fitness

    You really don't need a lot of fitness on the standard popular treks although as Rich points out, the more fitness you have the more you will enjoy the trip.

    To put that in context, for my first trip in the Everest region I trained for approx 6 weeks prior by walking up a trail to the top of a nearby lookout 2-3 times per week. This hill is approx 200m in altitude gain.

    I then carried my own pack (nearly 18kg) from Lukla to Gorak Shep. I will admit that I did struggle on a few days but I was a moderate to heavy smoker at the time.

    I would recommend hill walks with a few kg in a backpack (water bottles work very well) a few times per week. I'll let you decide what "a few" means based on what sort of trip you are planning.

    There is a good write up of Altitude Sickness on wikipedia

    As a general rule of thumb keep your altitude gains to no more than 300m per day once over 3000m and take a rest day if you're feeling tired. If you have to climb 4-500m in a particular day due to the space of villages or other issues out of your control then reduce your altitude climb on the following day to average out the gains.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Espoo,Finland
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Fitness

    If you can walk 15 km in about 4-5 hours in varied terrain carrying the load you plan to take, and feel like you could repeat it the next day, you are good to go. No need to do any special exercises. I have osteoarthritis and am 10-15 kg overweight, and still can do treks and keep up with just about any standard trekker.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Fitness

    I think good conditioning would start with jogging and cardio exercise. Test your endurance before a trek.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: Fitness

    Head, heart and legs exercise. You can do anything if you really want if your heart is healthy and legs are strong. Whatever exercise you do which makes you sweat, thirsty and hungry will help. I have seen most people who read, know or hear about altitude sickness get sick because they think too much about it. Most Nepal treks start at hot, sunny, humid place and gently goes up to colder and colder places. Weather appropriate clothing and cuisine recommended. I grew up in walking to school, swimming in creeks and eating whatever is on table. May be that helped me. I have done mountaineering trips in a few countries including Himalaya without any preparation training for any of those. I feel it first few days then it become normal. I have heard people climb up and down the stairs of multi-story building for training. Think you can do and you are still young !

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Fitness

    Quote Originally Posted by Petrus View Post
    If you can walk 15 km in about 4-5 hours in varied terrain carrying the load you plan to take, and feel like you could repeat it the next day, you are good to go. No need to do any special exercises. I have osteoarthritis and am 10-15 kg overweight, and still can do treks and keep up with just about any standard trekker.
    Agreed with Petrus Walk / Jogging would be best option

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