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Thread: Overpricing in the lodges

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    15

    Default Overpricing in the lodges

    Some lodges are way out of order in my humble opinion.Charging me 400 rupees for a dhal baht.Ok if there are refills fine but it was served on an expensive plate with nice cutlery and NO offer of seconds .!!!The food was Ok but not enough and at that high cost.That is not Nepalese hospitality just pure profiteering.I can name the lodge too.Sonam Lodge in Jharkot.And others too.
    This is nothing if you have a job in US or Europe but thats not the case for all.Just because we look white were not rich.Anyway I think the trekkers are too damn nice when it comes to paying the bill.Pay fair price.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,851

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    Agree. I think rather than paying 400 rupees for a dhal bhaat, trekkers should stay at home, and not go to screwy places like Nepal.

    Secondly, if they do, how about they paint their faces black (so they don't look white) and maybe dress with second hand clothing from op-shops (so they don't look rich).
    yakshaver

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Espoo,Finland
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    Certainly tourists pay 3 to 4 times the price locals do. The only way to evade inflated costs is to have some local buy you raw materials from the market and then cook your own food using trailside twigs and scrap wood like the porters do.

    In seriousness the biggest ripoff is the price of tea in higher lodges. Big pots can be up to 800 rupees. Many times we found out it is cheaper to just order single cups. The funniest thing is that the same amount of hot water costs 150 rupees if it is no used for drinking! Go figure...

    Apparently the lodge owners know about the hydration (and sterile water)panic trekkers have at altitude and cash on that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,851

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    Hm, the solution to the water scam would be for tourists to bring dehidrated water with them. You can buy it in the good outdoors shops. I do that all the time. On trek,I simply add water to it. It costs me nothing.


    The other thought I have: why not trek in the Alps? It is a lot cheaper. No one rips you off there. The best bargain I found is paying only 190 Swiss Franks for a 2 hour train journey to Jungfrau! Excellent value! Did not need to take dehidrated water with me. The drinks up there at 3700m altitude were only 10 swiss franks each.
    Last edited by yakshaver; 7th October 2009 at 03:10 AM.
    yakshaver

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    Hey Dhalbhastart, chill!

    So far, you're not happy with the thieving locals, the corrupt and lazy government, the potential dangers of going off trail, anticipated rip-off massages and now the cutlery!!

    Perhaps try another country where your poor but pale face is better respected...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    dhalbhastart,

    Never look back, Never look forward...Stay in the Now...Take a deep breath in, hold it, let it out...

    There don't you feel better?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pokhara, Nepal
    Posts
    308

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    Simple solution: Read the menu and if you don't like the price, keep walking.

    Deal with the cost BEFORE you eat. not after. One nationality has a reputation for walking out without paying when they think the price is too high. Some lodges won't take these people anymore.

    Food prices are skyrocketing in Nepal and the poor monsoon this year means that there will be a rice shortage.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    I would like to offer, which I hope is a balanced view on the subject of 'overpricing'.
    I have trekked several times in Nepal now and on most occasions found the costs to be very fair. On my first trek in 2001 the prices were extremely low, since then there has been a fair bit of inflation due to a number of factors, the economy being the main one. I am aware that some lodges do try to charge way over the going rate for some things and it is always best to agree costs before accepting. The Nepalese people are no different to anyone else, we are all human, some people are happy to make a reasonable living, others are greedy and money driven and will try to exploit whereever and whenever. It happens globally throughout the human race no matter what colour, race or creed.
    Those lodgeowners who do continue to overcharge will eventually pay the price as their reputation will be damaged and trekkers will just go elsewhere, there are, in most cases, always a number of lodges to choose from at the end of the day.
    I am returning to the Annapurna circuit in Nov/Dec this year so I will be able to see first hand whether there is a justified case to complain about pricing.
    But to be fair, if there is a case that lodges are getting greedy then it is reasonable to complain [to the lodge owner] as you would in any other country and not feel guilty for doing so. I feel that I know whats reasonable and what isnt whilst trekking and yes to be honest I wouldnt expect to be charged western prices for food and lodging. [obviously you should expect to pay more the higher up you go especially if you desire western type foods, energy chocolate bars etc] Thankfully my experiences have mainly been good ones with the people of Nepal being most warm and helpful.

    Concerning the 'people of a certain country' that you encounter whilst trekking, yes they are on the main most arrogant and obnoxiously rude to the lodgeowners, not just in Nepal but other countries also and try to get everything for almost nothing often leaving a trail of rubbish behind them. Maybe its a cultural thing, in which case I will be giving their country a miss, but I have met a few of their fellow countrymen who have been extremely nice and whom try to distance themselves from the main.

    Well thats my bit. except to say that I am very excited about returning to the lovely Nepal soon.... and please if you do find yourself feeling hard done by, ensure you communicate curtiously and from then on agree your prices beforehand, then continue in a positive mindset, don't let it spoil your wonderful trip of a lifetime.
    Sally

  9. #9

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    What is the present price for say a dal bhaat at Ghorepani or a bowl of noodle soup?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    139

    Default Re: Overpricing in the lodges

    One has to consider that in higher regions it is not so much the little teebag which has to carried for days uphill, but als every nail an construction material for the lodge. Also the kerosine for heating up the water must be carried up all the way. So i understand that the prices are alo going up.
    If some one has only very little money he can travel with a little stove and 2 liters of kerosine. With that you can boil a lot of water, drink tee or have a noodlesoup for lunch.
    That would be a positive approach.

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