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Thread: Diamox

  1. #1
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    Question Diamox

    Dear readers,
    can somebody plz explain when sud i start to take diamox, one tab. is 250mg, is there any specific height dat u need to start taking it,e.g. frm 2500m+, if so do i take it two tab. twice a day??

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Diamox

    Quote Originally Posted by catmandu
    Dear readers,
    can somebody plz explain when sud i start to take diamox, one tab. is 250mg, is there any specific height dat u need to start taking it,e.g. frm 2500m+, if so do i take it two tab. twice a day??
    I take diamox from about 3000m altitude, or just before. I take half a tablet in the morning, and half in late afternoon or evening with food.

    This is to spread the effect more evenly over the 24 hours.

    Of course I stop taking it as I start to go down.

    With diamox, because it is a diuretic, make sure you drink lots of fluids, and be prepared to pee often.
    yakshaver

  3. #3
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    Thumbs down Re: Diamox

    Hi,

    There has been a lot of discussions on the dutch website nepal.pagina.nl about the use of diamox. Actualy diamox hides all symptons of high altitude sickness, in other words, taking diamox is fooling yourself with even the risk of death. Better listen to your body, go on slowly take time to get used to high altitude, etc, etc. If you have a headache, just wait before taking some pills, etc, etc. Walking in the mountains on "medication".......?????? only with expeditions, when there is no way down. As normal trekker, just calculate more time instead of speeding up.
    There is a list of scores for points of high altitude sickness, which can lead you in a safe way up the mountain IF you stick with it.

    Harry
    Last edited by Harry; 9th October 2006 at 11:31 PM.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Diamox

    Catmandu,

    Some people swear by diamox some people refuse to touch it. Please do a bit of research whichever way you go. I always say that health and taxation are both areas where you must make your own educated decision.

    There are a whole heaps of threads mentioning diamox on this site alone http://www.trekinfo.com/forums/searc...searchid=34242

    I can't remember whether the Lonely Planet guide book has a write up on diamox but I do know that the Jamie McGuiness Trailblazer guidebook has a whole chapter on medicines.

    You should educate yourself about the symptoms of AMS either way.

  5. #5
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    Post Re: Diamox

    An excellent article about AMS ant its treatments (diamox, diamethasone):

    http://www.ismmed.org/np_altitude_tutorial.htm

    []s
    Ktrek

  6. #6

    Talking Re: Diamox

    First of all if you are ill and need to take diamox you have totally disregarded rule #1 of high altitude climbing. Above 10,000 ft. don't take on more than 1000 ft. of altitude in a 24 hour period from where you started. Diamox is not a cure so if you are ailing go back down to the altitude you last felt good at. This is the only cure, to disregard this is inviting cerebal edema which will cause you some serious problems if you are high enough. If you start at 14000 ft. for example you can go as high as you want during the day, (I.E. 18000 ft) just make sure you snooze and recuperate at 15000 ft. Take care and be a wise trekker, there isn't a whole lot of rescue teams out there in the hills Happy trails

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Diamox

    I was just talking to a climber here in Namche who has just come back from climbing Ama Dablam, he happened to also be a cardiologist in his spare time... his view on Diamox was that it does more harm than good and that you are far better to drink lots of fluids, ascend slowly and listen to your body...

    Also, on the all the trails in the Solu Khumbu, there are 1 page leaflets posted by the High Altitude Clinics asking for volunteers to do a blind study on the actual effectiveness of Diamox...the deal is they give you tablets to take on your way up to Lobuche, the only thing is you don't know if they are sugar tablets or diamox, you then need to record how your feeling and what effects and then get back to them on the way back...it seems the jury is still out on diamox effectiveness even from the high altitude doctors in Nepal.

    I have just yesterday come over Cho La 5350m from Gokyo and the whole trip have not taken Diamox and have not had anything as serious as even a headache.

  8. #8
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    Lightbulb Re: Diamox

    The more you've been on altitude, the more you learn how your body responds on it. So for those who first time get on higher levels than they ever been before, diamox might look like a good solution, but as told before it's just fooling yourself. Being on high altitude means you have to practise and see the results before going on any medication. Just take your time and might even take year to recover what it is about.
    Going to fast; like bumping your head to the line where you get the headache and more!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Diamox

    Certainly going up slowly and listening to your bio-feedback is the best thing. However I disagree with some of the negative comments made about diamox. It is helping to prevent altitude sickness to some extent, and research has found it to be useful. Of course it is not a "cure", nor does it provide total protection.

    But, used in conjunction with common-sense ascent rate, it is useful. I will try to get my hands on the research, when I have a bit of time, link it here...
    yakshaver

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Diamox

    Yes, Spaceman i agree with with your post regarding diamox, research ams and the taking of diamox thoroughly before you go to high altitude, hopefully then you can make positive choices whether you really need to take it or not.

    I wont give specific advice on that sort of thing, but i can tell you my experience with diamox and my altitude tolerance so far.

    I have been at high altitude six times, in Nepal i walked very slowly, im a slow walker anyway, so it didnt worry me, arriving in Namche my head pounded, but after a couple of days it wore off, mostly through resting there a couple of days, doing light walks up higher and sleeping in Namche, the walk high sleep low to help acclimatise. I had the start of a stomach upset in Namche but obviously you have to carry on!

    Carried on with the trek, went up Pokalde, no problems apart from the dodgy stomach , now this is where it started to go wrong, you are up in the early hours to do Pokalde, 3am start, the walking didnt end that day until 4.30pm and not only was i exhausted, i was also dehydrated from the stomach upset and lack of enough fluids. I wasnt suffering from any ams syptoms at this point, just tired.

    One rest day, then a start to push on to Island Peak, but at this point i really hadnt been taking on enough fluids, from the exertion of the Pokalde day and bad stomach, but i didnt realise that, i wish i had known then what i know now. I think if i had taken on a lot more fluids and maybe taken something to stop the stomach problem i would have coped a lot better on Island Peak, did i feel rough, at Island base camp i felt sick, my head pounded, i wanted to die, honestly thats no joke, i felt that rough.

    Instead of mentioning it to anyone i just carried on the next day going up to Island Peak high camp, my head was absolutley pounding, i swelled up like a mitchellin man, at this point i couldnt hide it, it was suggested i take a quater tablet of diamox, which i did, that made me feel just as bad as the other symptoms going on, it gave me severe pins and needles all over, and i mean severe, in hindsight, what i should have done was go back down to base camp, rested and take on as much fluids as possible. It took me five days to recover, i didnt eat for most of that time, but i did drink a lot, i think taking on the fluid, and having the stomach problem under control, albeit with drugs i started to recover.

    When i go back to high altitude, i am going to make sure i drink non stop, even when not thirsty, you have to drink, drink and more drink, not the alchoholic variety either!

    I would rather avoid having to take diamox, and i think if I get the fluids right and walk slow, take my time, enjoy the scenery, take photos etc hopefully i shouldnt have any problems. I read on a climbing website for climbers going up Everest that the people taking on five litres of fluid a day suffered less, if not at all from ams symptoms.

    Its an interesting subject this one, whether you should take drugs to keep off altitude sickness or whether you should go drug free and listen to what your body is telling you.

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