Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 50 of 50

Thread: Annapurna Circuit trip report

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    England
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    I'm with this converted SLR club. I too thought that there was little point in me taking my SLR, and suffering the weight until I looked through your photos Escher. Very inspiring. I can't wait to get out there, though it will be some months yet for me.

    Just a question about the equipment. I do know my limitations, and there is just no way that I will be taking the number of lenses you mentioned! In any case, I don't own that many lenses. In fact, I only own one: A Sigma 30mm F1.4. It takes very sharp photos, and though there are limitations with its range, I have been reluctant to buy a cheaper quality zoom. Equivalent quality zoom lenses would be sky high in price, so I haven't bothered to buy one. Do you think I would miss out by not taking a zoom? I seen you have a Canon F4 zoom, are you happy with the quality of it, and how heavy is it?

    Again, lovely photos, thanks for sharing. DE.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Posts
    516

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    Once again I have looked through this thread and I still get this grabbing
    sensation in my body when I scroll through Eschers pictures.

    Dare I add to this? I have a pocket camera and it certainly does not make
    pictures comparable in terms photographic clarity. But still, there is one angle I
    have not yet seen in this thread. It is Thorong La shot from below, on the way
    to Kagbeni. It must be Jharkot low centre, and Muktinath in the background.

    I love this, looking back at where I have come. Sometimes I am quite
    amazed at how far I have come in just one day.



    Thorong La from below

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,285

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    Quote Originally Posted by deserteyes
    Do you think I would miss out by not taking a zoom? I seen you have a Canon F4 zoom, are you happy with the quality of it, and how heavy is it?
    Yes I do! Nepal is absolutely fabulous for photography; scenery, people, culture - everything is there. The f4 L series zooms are excellent (the 70-200 is a gem and I use it for portraits as well as a telephoto) but they aren't cheap (but of course a lot cheaper than the f2.8 L series zooms). The 70-200 is about 1/2 kg and the 17-40 a little lighter. Only you can decide what you are prepared to carry. I am (relatively) happy to carry 4-5kgs of camera kit. Most people won't be.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Escher

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    Also impressed with the stunning photographs.Is that a digital camera you used?

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    Escher, can you share some of the aperture and shutter speed details of your landscape photos? Also, do you shoot with ND filters?

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,285

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    Sorry JackFriday I never saw your reply and yes I do use a DSLR a Canon 40D.

    Humid Northerlies: with a crop sensor on the 40D I generally shoot F8 for all landscapes, I find a smaller fstop above F8-F11 does not increase the depth of field as diffraction on a small sensor comes into play. I always get the best results at F8 and that also hits the sweet spot of my lenses. I rarely use ND grads as most of the shots I take are on the move while I am trekking and getting filters and the tripod out is too much faff but I bracket everything +/-1 to 1.5 stops and shoot RAW so I can recover highlights and use Lightroom 2 to process and use the grad tool that that has. Occasionally the highlights are too blown or the contrast is too high to work, it depends on the conditions really but I find even at altitude when the sun is striking the ground as well as the mountains then the difference between fore and background is within the dynamic range of the camera. If it is wider than the camera can cope with then I will just pick out details with the telephoto or shoot flowers or insects. Just depends on the conditions really.

    I mostly put my camera on aperture priority and f8 for landscapes and let it set the shutter speed and adjust the ISO to get the shutter speed quick enough to avoid camera shake. Often I am out of breath climbing a hill and not very steady so I leave a bit more room to make the shutter speed quick enough so you might have heard people say you should use1/focal length to be steady, but I go for 1.5/focal length-ish. so 40mm = 1/60, 200mm 1/300 and so on. Anyway that is what works for me!

    If taking pictures in the evening after finding a room in a lodge I'll get the tripod out and set the camera to manual or shutter priority and play with longer exposures.

    Hope that wasn't too much! I don't know your photography experience so I am happy to explain more (or less!) if that'll help.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Escher

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    564

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    I'm just thinking about commissioning Escher to accompany me on my next trek (whenever that may be) as official trek photographer. I need photo's of that, and that and get some good shots of that......

    I've tried listening to his advice for the last couple of years and my photography is improving but still got some way to go.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    Quote Originally Posted by Escher
    Sorry JackFriday I never saw your reply and yes I do use a DSLR a Canon 40D.

    Humid Northerlies: with a crop sensor on the 40D I generally shoot F8 for all landscapes, I find a smaller fstop above F8-F11 does not increase the depth of field as diffraction on a small sensor comes into play. I always get the best results at F8 and that also hits the sweet spot of my lenses. I rarely use ND grads as most of the shots I take are on the move while I am trekking and getting filters and the tripod out is too much faff but I bracket everything +/-1 to 1.5 stops and shoot RAW so I can recover highlights and use Lightroom 2 to process and use the grad tool that that has. Occasionally the highlights are too blown or the contrast is too high to work, it depends on the conditions really but I find even at altitude when the sun is striking the ground as well as the mountains then the difference between fore and background is within the dynamic range of the camera. If it is wider than the camera can cope with then I will just pick out details with the telephoto or shoot flowers or insects. Just depends on the conditions really.

    I mostly put my camera on aperture priority and f8 for landscapes and let it set the shutter speed and adjust the ISO to get the shutter speed quick enough to avoid camera shake. Often I am out of breath climbing a hill and not very steady so I leave a bit more room to make the shutter speed quick enough so you might have heard people say you should use1/focal length to be steady, but I go for 1.5/focal length-ish. so 40mm = 1/60, 200mm 1/300 and so on. Anyway that is what works for me!

    If taking pictures in the evening after finding a room in a lodge I'll get the tripod out and set the camera to manual or shutter priority and play with longer exposures.

    Hope that wasn't too much! I don't know your photography experience so I am happy to explain more (or less!) if that'll help.

    Escher that was great thank you. Pretty much just what I was looking for. I have the experience of butchering a great number of landscape photos in the past using f22! You learn your lessons hard!
    Also it's nice to hear you can get such good results in the day without using a tripod or without fussing with filters.
    It's a shame I don't have any L series lens, I'm having to shoot with the 17-85mm EF-S, which seems to do alright as a walkaround for me (using a 20D). UV filter I just keep on as standard. May also take my very small and light 50mm.
    I'm somewhat tempted to grab an ND filter....

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,285

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    My partner has a 17-85 and I think it's a pretty darn good lens. L lenses have their disadvantages if you have to carry them!

    Not posted any in a while so here are some more:-


    Marsyangdi road crew


    Highest tea house in the world?


    Terraces


    Carved water chutes
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Escher

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    56

    Default Re: Annapurna Circuit trip report

    that guy in the blue shirt looks like he's about to throw a punch

    great photos though

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •