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jess_star
29th April 2008, 10:39 AM
I am planning to trek the annapurna circut , including the sancutary and anything i can fit in.
i dont plan on making this a quick trip.
I want to spend maybe 60 days there. is that enough ?!
I have heard about the recent "warnings" although this doesnt concern me much,
What would someone suggest money wise $USD per day to live back-packer style but comfortably.
any advice on places to stay, suggestions on must have to take, any advice would be much appriciated :-)

thanks

yakshaver
29th April 2008, 09:23 PM
I am planning to trek the annapurna circut , including the sancutary and anything i can fit in.
i dont plan on making this a quick trip.
I want to spend maybe 60 days there. is that enough ?!
I have heard about the recent "warnings" although this doesnt concern me much,
What would someone suggest money wise $USD per day to live back-packer style but comfortably.
any advice on places to stay, suggestions on must have to take, any advice would be much appriciated :-)

thanks

Jess,

60 days is a lot of time, and if you have this much time, you could do a lot of things in Nepal.

Annapurna Circuit and Sanctuary will take you about 25 days, maybe 30 days if you really stretch it. You can do this by doing a lot of side trips (there are some wonderful side trips on the circuit) or by spending extra time in very nice places like Chame, Manang, Jharkot, Kagbeni, Nagwal, Marpha, Dana, Tatopani etc.

You can do another trek, maybe visit the EBC and Gokyo areas in Khumbu (Everest region) or maybe do Langtang and Helambu. As well, you could spend some time relaxing in Chitwan or Bardia, the two biggest jungle national parks in Nepal.

If you spend 60 days in Nepal, I suggest you take time to go to nice luxury places every now and then in order to keep your sanity and relax. This can be done relatively easily in Kathmandu, Pokhara and Chitwan.

Take breaks between treks etc, spend a few days in a nice lodge in Chitwan, or in a nice hotel in Kathmandu or Pokhara - relax, take in the sights, go to nice cafes and restaurants, and smell the roses (as there is enough crap around most other places...)

Nepal is an absolutely magnificent country and the people are very nice. But it can definitely be overwhelming for the first time visitor, espcially certain parts and aspects of it. So taking breaks in relaxing more luxurious places helps the sheltered westerner to cope, and recharge batteries for another trek or visit in some other corner of Nepal.

Cost per day on trek: budget for 20 Euro, or maybe 30 USD (food and accomodation). You can trek for much less, but will need to sleep in the lesser loges on trek, and eat maybe just dhal bhaat...

On tope of that, budget some money for a guide or porter, or maybe a porter-guide, if you want to. This can be anywhere betwen 10-25 USD per day, including their food and lodging.

For Kathmandu and Pokhara, a decent hotel will cost 20-30 USD per day. A more luxury one can be around 70-100. You can sleep in these places for as low as 5 USD/day or less, if you want common bathroom and toilet etc.

jess_star
30th April 2008, 09:07 AM
Woah, thats fantastic!!! thanks for the info. it has always been my dream to goto Nepal and see its beauty.

:-D thanks heaps!

jess_star
30th April 2008, 09:09 AM
ooh, also, with a guide, is it nessesary to have one? i was thinking i might do without, whats your opinion on this.
i was told it can be the best thing or the worst, any reccomended companies?

yakshaver
30th April 2008, 11:41 AM
ooh, also, with a guide, is it nessesary to have one? i was thinking i might do without, whats your opinion on this.
i was told it can be the best thing or the worst, any reccomended companies?


You can trek on the classical Everest/Gokyo, Annapurna or Langtang treks without employing a guide/porter. Many tourists do that, and opinion on this forum and others is divided on the issue. Although there is not much judgment passed on one way or the other, it is more a matter of preference and style.

You are unlikely to get lost on such treks. But there can be issues sometimes with injuries, and on a first trek I usually recommend people go with a guide or porter guide.

It is true, a guide or porter-guide can make a good trek great. I have also hears of some bad stories.

I like the companionship, and I definitely like my bag (even if I have only about 10-12 kg, to be carried by a porter. Especially as we hit 4000 m altitude, and the hight starts to have an effect on you...

Sharon, myself and others have emplyed guides/porters over the years, and some repeatedly, as they are very very good. Both professionally and as people in general.

I may write you a private message with my recommendation for a guide and porter/guide.

Lars
1st May 2008, 05:00 PM
ooh, also, with a guide, is it nessesary to have one?
It is not necessary really. Not as long as you stick to the well traveled treks,
and particularly not if you have a lot of time and want to go slow and take
many rest days just to hang out in the lovely area. If you have a guide/porter
then it would be a bit like having a taxi waiting for you when you are sipping
latte and chatting with other hang arounds.

I don't mind carrying my own stuff, and see trekking partly as an opportunity
for exercise. When it feels to heavy I just slow down or take a chocolate
break. And I am a bit obsessed with the idea of being able to change my
plans without having to explain to anyone why and what now.

I also love the opportunity for long conversations with other trekkers from
around the world. It may not be entirely PC but I do, quite frankly, much
more value hanging out and chatting with other westerners than porters and
guides who speak only limited English.

There are many thoughtful, well traveled, well read and very interesting
people trekking in the Himalayas. On my last trek we came to be a very good
group of people from all over. Not that we walked together much, but we
stayed in the same lodges and talked of many things. There were South
Africans, Australians, Americans, Russians, French, Swiss, Germans, a
Slovakian girl. We talked about the changes in South Africa, the upcoming
American election, the European Union, changes in Eastern Europe, movies,
music, traveling experiences etc etc. If any of us had been attached to a
guide it would not have happened. As a matter of fact we quite avoided
trekkers with guides.

Some day I will trek with a guide etc, but only when I really need to.

http://web.telia.com/~u84408784/Trek/Half_the_world.jpg
Half the world having summit dessert in Thorong Phedi.

Suginami
1st May 2008, 06:38 PM
I always hire a Nepali as I love being with someone from that country and we find plenty to talk about. I prefer mine to have a good knowledge of birds but that's not always possible. But I don't need one I just like Nepalis.

A brief talk to people along the trails and in the guest houses is fine but I just keep away from anything boring like US politics or things I just want to leave behind. I get sick of the 'where are you from' stuff. I always avoid walking with hikers as they talk too much and distract from birdlife and scenery.

jess_star
5th May 2008, 05:26 PM
Thanks for the advice !
Ill keep all in mind when planning my adventure, :)

Per
20th May 2008, 03:59 PM
I want to spend maybe 60 days there. is that enough ?!


Yes, it is enough, will give you and opportunity to make plenty of side trips and learn a lot about the area.


any advice on places to stay, suggestions on must have to take, any advice would be much appriciated :-)


Manang is a lovely village with a really peculiar history. I spend a month there. With that sort of time on your hands there are plenty of day hikes you can do. If the season is right you can also hike up to Tilicho, a stunning lake at almost 5000 m.

http://www.lowdin.nu/Treks/Tilicho81/Film0553.jpg

More info on http://www.lowdin.nu/Treks/Mesokantola/Tilicholake.html

On the other side of Thorung La, Jomsom, Marpha and Thukshey are really interesting villages, the same could be said for several others. Again if the season is right you can head up to the Hidden Valley http://www.lowdin.nu/Treks/Hiddenvalley/DhampusPass.html

There is no need for guides or porters. In fact such tend to distance you from the locals. In fact most locals between Tal and Tato Pani, the most interesting area of the trek, consider portering degrading. Unless they are totally destitute they will not work as human beasts of burden. Instead they use real mules!

Oli
21st May 2008, 06:17 AM
I have trekked with and without a guide/porter - both styles have their merits. For my next trek I am planning on having a Nepali friend along to help carry my bag and practice my Nepali.

Malai alchee lagyo
I'm feeling lazy

;)